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Fire / EMS National Trend Report (Sample)

Last updated on 2018-11-02

Service Area Overview

Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are components of public safety departments, which serves to protect the lives of  individuals and the integrity of property within a jurisdiction.  Fire services respond to calls for service in cases of household, commercial, and industrial fires and safety hazards.  EMS provides ambulatory services, medical stabilization, and paramedical attention for individuals experiencing life-threatening medical emergencies.   

Influencing Factors Include

  • Demographics:  Jurisdictional land area and levels of urban density may affect calls for service and response times.  Aging infrastructure and little/no space between structures increase the risk of a fire spreading to adjacent structures.  Communities with higher densities and less land area may have decreased travel times for fire and emergency vehicles.
  • Automatic/Mutual Aid Agreements:  Some jurisdictions are not able to provide the fastest response times for priority one calls at or near jurisdictional boundaries.  In order to provide the highest levels of public safety, these jurisdictions enter into automatic aid or mutual aid agreements, which state that the nearest fire station will respond to calls for service, regardless of jurisdictional boundaries.
  • Special Services:  Response times may be affected by the availability of special services,  such as Hazardous Materials.

 

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Footnotes

Residential Population: EMS

EMS Population: EMS population served may vary from the general population of the jurisdiction if there are other territories served by interlocal agreement.

EXCLUDE

  • Population only served via automatic/mutual aid.

National Peers: Albany, Austin, Bettendorf, Bowling Green, Branson, Clayton, Clearwater, Columbia, Dallas, Denison, Dublin, Fairfax County, Farmers Branch, Germantown, Goodyear , Grandview, Harrisonville, Hermosa Beach, Irving, Johnson City, Kansas City, La Vista, McAllen, McKinney, Mesa, Miami-Dade County, Midland, Milton, New Orleans, Newton, Novi, Oklahoma City, Olathe, Oshkosh, Raleigh, Rancho Cucamonga, Richmond Heights, San Antonio, Santa Fe County, Sarasota County, Scottsdale, Tracy, Windsor

Emerg. Fire Travel Time: Dispatch to Arrival: %4 min or under

Emerg. Fire Travel Time: % 4 Min or Under: Dispatch to Arrival: INCLUDE
● All calls dispatched to fire suppression staff, regardless of the priorities they were assigned.
● All fire calls dispatched, NFIRS Series 100, within the official service area, regardless of whether the jurisdiction or a neighboring agency was the first to have a unit arrive on the scene.
EXCLUDE
● Calls for EMS (NFIRS series 300; whether based in a fire or EMS department). This information is requested in a separate section.
● Calls for mutual or automatic aid where the jurisdiction is not the official first responder, per the service area identified in the beginning of the survey, or assistance as part of any other out-of-jurisdiction strike team.
● Calls later determined to have been false alarms or good intent calls (NFIRS series 600-700)
● Other non-fire calls, (e.g., NFIRS series 200, 400, 500, 800 or 900).
DEFINITIONS:
● Emergency calls
INCLUDE all calls dispatched as emergency calls (lights and sirens), regardless of traffic or weather conditions that may be encountered en route.
EXCLUDE those calls that are downgraded from emergency to non-emergency prior to engine arrival due to: 1) false alarm, 2) fire having already been extinguished.

Response time has multiple components, some of which may overlap. To allow for a calculation of total response time, as perceived by the caller, the components of response time requested in this template are designed to exclude overlap. These components are:
● PSAP Processing Time: The time it takes to transfer a 911 call from the point at which it is answered at the Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) to the point where the fire/EMS call taker answers the call. If the PSAP call taker is the fire/EMS dispatcher, then enter 0, then proceed to remaining response time questions. If 911 calls are first answered by the sheriff's or police department, and then transferred to fire/EMS, enter the time from when that department answered the call to when it is transferred to fire/EMS.
● Call Entry: This is the point when the fire/EMS call taker answers the call.
● Dispatch: This is the conclusion of the dispatch process (notification of the station and affected company) for the first-dispatched unit. Dispatch is not considered completed solely upon initial tone-out. If additional responders are necessary, either immediately following the first-dispatched response or after on-scene evaluation of the incident, the time to dispatch these units should be excluded from the time to “conclusion of dispatch “.
● Turnout Time: This is the time from conclusion of dispatch to when the first responding unit is en route to the scene.
● Arrival on Scene: This is the time when first responding unit is on scene, regardless of whether this was the first unit dispatched.
● “X minutes and under”
INCLUDE all responses up to and including X minutes, regardless of conditions that may be encountered during the response (e.g., traffic, severe weather, etc.) that may make the response time “out of the jurisdiction's control. “ The intent of this question is not to capture what policies, goals or standards jurisdictions may have, but what they have actually experienced. For instance, if the adopted standard states that 90% of emergency calls should be responded to within a given period of time, and of 20 calls, 17 were responded to within that period of time, while 3 encountered heavy traffic and delayed arrival, the response should be 85% of all emergency responses, (not 100% of all non-disqualified emergency responses). Please enter the percentages as decimals, for example, for 55%, please enter 0.55.
EXCLUDE responses that exceed X minutes by any amount (e.g., a call responded to in 5 minutes, 1 second or 5 minutes, 59 seconds would not be considered to have been responded to in 5 minutes or less.)

National Peers: Austin, Bettendorf, Bowling Green, Branson, Clayton, Columbia, Dallas, Denison, Fairfax County, Fort Worth, Goodyear , Greer, Hermosa Beach, Johnson City, Lakeville, McAllen, McKinney, Mesa, Midland, Milton, Newton, Novi, Oklahoma City, Olathe, Oshkosh, Raleigh, Rancho Cucamonga, Richmond Heights, San Antonio, Savannah, Scottsdale

Expenditures per capita: Fire and EMS

Expenditures Per Capita: Fire&EMS: Calculated as expenditure: total fire/EMS personnel and operations (including support charged to department) divided by residential population of area served: fire suppression

National Peers: Albany, Austin, Bettendorf, Bowling Green, Clayton, Clearwater, Columbia, Dallas, Denison, Fairfax County, Germantown, Goodyear , Grandview, Greer, Harrisonville, Hermosa Beach, Irving, Johnson City, Kansas City, Lakeville, McAllen, McKinney, Mesa, Midland, Milton, Newton, Novi, Oklahoma City, Olathe, Oshkosh, Raleigh, Rancho Cucamonga, Richmond Heights, San Antonio, Santa Fe County, Savannah, Scottsdale, Tracy

Fire and EMS FTEs vs. Responses per 1,000 population

FTEs: Sworn Fire&EMS per 1,000 population: Calculated as FTEs: sworn fire&EMS divided by the residential population of area served: fire suppression times 1000

EMS: BLS+ALS Responses Per 1,000 Population: To be calculated as total BLS and ALS responses, multiplied by 1,000, and divided by the EMS population served.

Square Miles of Land Area Served: Land area only.

National Peers: Austin (TX), Bettendorf (IA), Clayton (MO), Columbia (MO), Dallas (TX), Denison (TX), Harrisonville (MO), Hermosa Beach (CA), Mesa (AZ), Midland (MI), New Orleans (LA), Oklahoma City (OK), Olathe (KS), Richmond Heights (MO), Scottsdale (AZ), Tracy (CA).

Fire and EMS Personnel and Operations Expenditures

Expenditure: Total Fire/EMS Personnel and Operations: Expenditure: Total fire/EMS personnel and operations (including support charged to department) 

INCLUDE
• All sworn and civilian fire/EMS personnel expenditures
• All direct services expenditures for fire/EMS operations and maintenance, not budgeted amounts
• All internal or associated support services charged to fire/EMS, such as communications (911 and other), training academy, volunteer/paid-on-call stipends, hazmat, maintenance of fire/EMS vehicles, fuel, IT, workers compensation, or other internal service fund charges.
• Sales tax, gas taxes, or other tax, permit, license, or service payments made in connection with departmental purchases.
EXCLUDE
● Capital expenditures (as capital is defined by your jurisdiction).
● Offsets to expenditures via revenue received from the state or federal government as a rebate or distribution of sales tax, GST, or other funds.
● Combined public safety staff who carry out more generalized services across fire, EMS, and police functions.
● Accruals and expenditures for vehicle replacement.

National Peers: Albany, Austin, Bettendorf, Bowling Green, Charles County, Clayton, Clearwater, Columbia, Dallas, Denison, Fairfax County, Fort Worth, Germantown, Goodyear , Grandview, Greer, Harrisonville, Hermosa Beach, Irving, Johnson City, Kansas City, Lakeville, McAllen, McKinney, Mesa, Midland, Milton, Newton, Novi, Oklahoma City, Olathe, Oshkosh, Raleigh, Rancho Cucamonga, Richmond Heights, San Antonio, Santa Fe County, Savannah, Scottsdale, Tracy